Product News & Reviews

 
sqlab-review-5.jpg

SQLab 612 Ergowave Active Carbon Saddle - (road.cc)

The SQLab 612 Ergowave Active Carbon Saddle is expensive but packed with pressure-relieving, customisable tech. If you have challenges getting comfortable or regularly swap between aerodynamic and general riding, it could be the one saddle you need.

Pros: Adjustable, comfortable over long distances
Cons: Cost

SQLab was founded in Germany in 1992, and since then has specalised in high-end ergonomic products for body contact points: grips, saddles, bars, stems and pedals. Its focus is medical-research-led product development, and the Colubrid-entwined staff that forms its logo signifies its focus on keeping you healthy on your bike.

sqlab-review-4.jpg

Review – SQlab 311 Handlebars, 411 Innerbarends and 711 SY Grips (www.themtblab.com)

The new Innerbarends are wicked cool and highly functional, and the hand and arm relief they provide are greatly appreciated. The 711 SY Grips offer good ergonomics due to their boxy shape and wavy contours and three density rubber, and the wings provide superb Ulnar nerve comfort. The 311 handlebars provide excellent ergonomics and a comfortable and natural hand orientation, along with a functional combination of back, forward and up sweep, and a soothing blend of rigidity and damping.

SQlab produces ergonomic bike products, including saddles, grips, pedals, and handlebars. I have been having some severe issues with my hands lately while bike riding, and have suffered swelling, numbness and pain in the right hand. To get a complete impression of SQlab’s ergonomic steering control system and how their product suite might alleviate my issues, I installed their 311 handlebars, 411 Innerbarends and 711 SY grips on my full suspension Ibis Mojo HD3.

voodoo so17.jpg

VOODOO CYCLES ANNOUNCES NEW RADA STEEL GRAVEL BIKE WITH DISC BRAKES AND BIG RUBBER (www.cxmagazine.com)

This year’s Sea Otter Classic seemed to be a bit of an old school revival with legends like Chris Chance launching his Chris Cross and Joe Murray relaunching VooDoo Cycles. Although the company disappeared for a few years, the VooDoo brand is still strong and interest and hopes remain high. Mountain Bike Hall of Fame legend Joe Murray is still with the company and he was on hand with several new models. Helping Murray out is Daryl Roberts, who formerly worked at Titus before creating his own company called Form Cycles. Based out of Arizona, VooDoo has titanium, alloy and even scandium models in its ever growing line-up, but we got a close-up look the all new Rada gravel bike made from Reynolds 853 steel.

sqlab-review-1.jpg

NO NUMB BUMS: SQLAB 612 ACTIVE ERGOWAVE SADDLE REVIEW (http://www.cycleexif.com)

Saddles are perhaps the most personal item in cycling – what works perfectly for one rider could feel like sitting on pine cones to another. For some, even the visual appeal of a particular saddle could be enough for them to persist with something less comfortable, or to reject what might otherwise be the perfect perch in the case of an uglier duckling.

voodoo-news-1.jpg

IB16: Voodoo Cycles prepares to recast their spell on the U.S. with new high end bike line (www.bikerumor.com)

If you’ve been riding long enough, you probably at least know someone who had a Voodoo. Chances are also pretty good that same Voodoo may be still hanging in their garage or passed along to another family member. Somewhere along the way though, after an ownership shake up Voodoo bikes vanished from the U.S. marketplace only to become essentially a house brand for Halfords in the UK.

That part of Voodoo’s business probably won’t change, but the U.S. is about to see a whole new line of Voodoo Cycles that look to bring back the brand’s quality heritage after a five year absence. In the works for a while now, the project is back under the design lead of industry legend Joe Murray with help from Daryl Roberts who brings quite a bit of experience in titanium from Form Cycles and Roca Roja.

The line was shown for the first time at Interbike and is slowly making its way into production…

sqlab-review-3.jpg

Review: SQlab Saddle 611 Active Race - Custom Fit Saddles (magazine.bikesoup.com)

We wouldn't buy a bike that's too big for us, and we wouldn't buy a pair of lycra shorts that are too small either, so why would you settle for whatever saddle you get given on your new bike? Some of us are lucky enough to have a standard sized booty, but if you're experiencing discomfort on your saddle, the likelihood is that it doesn't fit you, and no amount of gel or cushion will fix it.

sqlab-review-2.jpg

SQlab 612 Ergowave Active Saddle - Review (www.pinkbike.com)

SQlab has been in the saddle scene since 2001, gathering information, undertaking scientific studies and even writing a book on the subject, literally: 'The Path to the Perfect Saddle.' Their latest Ergowave saddle technology was created in conjunction with Frankfurt's University Hospital and the Frankfurt University of Applied Sciences. 

The 612 Ergowave Active saddle promises a lot, with a choice of widths from 12-15cm in 1cm increments, and three interchangeable compounds of rubber elastomer to support your body weight using their 'Active Technology.' My saddle was the most affordable of the 612 range that features these two technologies with TiTube alloy rails and is priced at $189.99 USD / €149.95. 

sqlab-review-6.jpg
 

611 Ergowave Active - (www.nsmb.com)

The catalogue of thoughtful features injected into the SQLab 611 Ergowave Active saddle make the name seem comparatively simple. A wide nose for pressure relief on steep technical climbs, padding designed for better damping virbration than similar looking road models, kevlar in the high wear area and the obvious perineal relief zone all speak to attention to detail but are not features unique to SQLab's most ergonomic mountain bike saddle. What sets the Ergowave Active saddle apart is the uncoupling of shell flex from rail support. This reduces pressure on sit bones and provides back relief for long days in the saddle. It's also available in four different widths.